Introducing Ross Island Wines

Refinement
in a bottle

Message from Ross Island Brewing

THE BREWING PROCESS

Beer is usually regarded as the world’s most sophisticated fermented beverage. Its flavour, colour, mouthfeel, and strength can all vary more than any other craft beverage. Beer uses a broader range of ingredients, resulting in complexities that distilled spirits, wine, cider, mead, and other beverages cannot match. The level of precision required in its development is substantially higher. All of this leads us to the reason WE APPRECIATE BEER. It is both an artistic expression and a measure of scientific prowess. Mastering both is a success unlike any other. With that, let’s begin to know the principles of beer making!

 

2021

Current release

Villenoir Cabernet Sauvignon

well-chilled served Our genuinely crafted Villenoir Cabernet Sauvignon is a dry wine with traces of strawberry, lemon, and peach laced fruit.

Speak to a customer care specialist at: FR 555 555 0005

Message from Ross Island

We thrive on producing exquisite wines that enlighten the Palate and Soul..

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The Reds

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The Whites

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The estate

MILLING

The brewing process begins (at the brewery) with the crushing of whole grain malt with a mill. In general, barley is the most commonly utilised malt in a craft brewery. Wheat and rye are two more often utilised malted grains. Milling the malt for use in a certain recipe is important because it generates the requisite surface area on the endosperm of the malted grain. The next stage, mashing, will explain why this is such an important step!

The estate

MASHING

Mashing begins after milling is finished. This is the technique of combining crushed malt with extremely hot water. Consider making oatmeal! In general, the water temperature will be between 144 and 158 degrees Fahrenheit. During this stage, the distinction between “malted” grain and “unmalted” grain becomes crucial. Malted grain has undergone a controlled germination stage, which breaks down the endosperm and produces enzymes. Those enzymes become active when exposed to hot water at a specified temperature. When activated, they transform the malt’s easily available starches into sugars (maltose) and dextrins (think mouthfeel). This then becomes the beer’s body! The mash will take 30-120 minutes or more to complete, depending on the temperature and type of enzyme used. When the process is finished, the liquid is removed from the now-spent grain and delivered to the boil kettle. The leftover grain is then donated to a nearby farmer to feed his livestock! (Don’t worry, there’s no alcohol here yet.)

The estate

BOILING

The sugary liquid known as wort (pronounced wert) is brought to a boil in the boil kettle. The boiling of the wort is responsible for two major things. The first step is pasteurisation of the wort. The second option is to add hops or other tastes like ginger or molasses. The longer the hops are boiled in the wort, the more bitter the finished product is thought to be. Hops, on the other hand, are perceived as less bitter and more delicious if they are introduced at the very end of the boiling process. In most cases, wort is boiled for 60-90 minutes.

FERMENTATION

After the wort has been boiled, it is time to transfer it to a fermenter and throw brewers yeast into it! The wort must first be cooled. Yeast is a living creature that is quite particular about the temperature of its surroundings. As a result, as the wort is delivered to the fermenter, it passes via a heat exchanger. This method enables for precise cooling to a given temperature (usually 60-70 Fahrenheit for ales). Yeast is pitched into the fermenter once the transfer is complete. During the next 4-6 days, the yeast will devour all of the sugars produced in the mash and convert them to alcohol and carbon dioxide. When fermentation is complete, the now-“beer” will be refrigerated again for conditioning. This time, set the temperature to 30 degrees Fahrenheit. This method promotes yeast flocculation, or settling, to the fermentation tank’s bottom. This is done to aid in the clarification of the beer and to collect the yeast for re-use in the following beer.

The estate

RACKING

At the completion of the conditioning process, the beer will be filtered or placed immediately into a “Bright Tank.” This is where the beer is carbonated and stored until it is ready for kegging, bottling, or canning. Barrels can also be used to age wine! The beer is carbonated precisely and then placed in the right packaging. That is kegs and cans for Aslan Brewing Company.

DISTRIBUTION

Now that the beer is ready for consumption, it is released into the world! It is sold to either pubs and restaurants or to supermarket and convenience stores. For an ale, the entire process takes around two weeks, and for a lager, it can take up to six weeks or more.

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